Fenestraria


Fenestraria is a genus of succulent plants in the family Aizoaceae. The name of the genus comes form the Latin word "fenestra", meaning "window". The species are found in the winter rainfall region of southern Africa and to Namibia.

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Fenestraria Species, Baby's Toes, Window Plant

Category:

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Suitable for growing in containers

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From seed winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed sow indoors before last frost

From seed direct sow after last frost

From seed germinate in a damp paper towel

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant break open to collect seeds

Allow seedheads to dry on plants remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Baywood-Los Osos, California

Huntington Beach, California

Vista, California(10 reports)

North Augusta, South Carolina

Gardeners' Notes:

On Jul 28, 2011, abudoggie from Huntington Beach, CA wrote:

I bought two tiny plants at Lowe's Home Center in May and planted them together in one pot, side by side. I thought that they were exactly the same but they are slightly different. Aside from growing SO FAST (they are all one clump now), they are blooming and have two different color flowers. So now I have one big baby toes plant with white AND peach flowers

I love this plant! And she apparently loves Huntington Beach, Ca.

On Dec 12, 2008, vossner from East Texas,
United States (Zone 8a) wrote:

This pretty hates to be overwatered. Mine produces white flowers in early winter. Mine is potted outdoors and if I expect more than a shower, I put a plastic bag over it, for fear it will rot.

On Feb 18, 2008, concretebrunett from Brookeland, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

Bought two clumps from Wal-Mart in late spring 2007. One promptly died, the other has done very well.
I'm in zone 8B in southeast Texas, which can get very cold in the winter, and the daggum thing sent a bloom out in January!!
It is now February, it's still outside and it's got baby "Baby Toes" coming up, and possibly yet another flower.

On Nov 10, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Looks like something that would rot at the first sign of frost, but ended up being pretty hardy for southern California- does well in full blazing sun, as well as some shade.. but IS prone to rot in pots if kept too moist. Mine flowers all summer and fall, nearly til winter. Doesn't grow much, though. A 3" clump pretty much stays a 3" clump for a year or so. probably grows a bit, but not that I can tell.

On Sep 15, 2004, kbads from Kirksville, MO (Zone 5a) wrote:


Plant Highlights

With approximately 1,800 species, the Ice Plant Family (Aizoaceae) is a large and diverse assemblage of plants. These are often referred to as “mesembs” by those who grow them, with the name being a shortened version of the old family name Mesembryanthemaceae. Though some species in the family are found farther away, the great majority are concentrated in southern Africa, occurring in both summer-rainfall and winter-rainfall areas. The winter-rainfall area extends along the west coast of South Africa and into the adjacent southwestern corner of Namibia. Rainfall totals at the northern end of this strip, in South Africa’s Richtersveld and the neighboring part of Namibia, are quite low, below 5 inches (125 mm) per year, but this is augmented by fog extending inland from the Atlantic coast. One of the many mesembs found in this region is Fenestraria rhopalophylla, known by the delightful common name of “baby toes”.

Fenestraria is a monotypic genus, meaning that there is only one species, but there are two recognized subspecies: subsp. rhopalophylla and subsp. aurantiaca. The Orange River, which forms the border between South Africa and Namibia, is the dividing line between the two subspecies, with the white-flowered subsp. rhopalophylla occurring to the north of the river in Namibia, and the yellow-flowered subsp. aurantiaca found to the south in South Africa. Plants are seldom found more than 25 miles (40 km) inland.

The leaves of Fenestraria plants are more or less cylindrical, though they widen a little towards the end. Plants start out as a small tuft of erect leaves, eventually adding offsets to form small mats 4 inches or more across (10 cm). In nature, plants grow in sand and are buried except for the flattened leaf-ends, which are translucent and act as “windows” through which sunlight is transmitted to the remainder of the leaf. Growing in this manner has definite advantages for the plant, protecting it from persistent wind off the ocean and slowing the loss of water in its dry environment. Of the two subspecies, subsp. aurantiaca is the larger, with leaves up to 1.2 inches long (3 cm), while the leaves of subsp. rhopalophylla are on average a little shorter. The translucent “windows” are ¼ to ⅓ of an inch across (6 to 8 mm).

Winter is the flowering season for Fenestraria, and plants in bloom are quite showy, whether it be the white flowers of subsp. rhopalophylla or the yellow to coppery or orange-yellow of subsp. aurantiaca. The flowers of subsp. rhopalophylla are up to 2 inches in diameter (50 mm), while those of subsp. aurantiaca are generally a little larger (up to 2¾ inches/70 mm). The many-petaled flowers rise above the leaves on stalks 1.6 to 2 inches high (4-5 cm).

The capsules that follow the flowers have 8 to 16 chambers containing small whitish seeds. At maturity the capsules detach and are blown by the wind as a means of dispersing the seed.


Fenestraria Species, Baby's Toes, Window Plant

Category:

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed sow indoors before last frost

From seed direct sow after last frost

From seed germinate in a damp paper towel

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant break open to collect seeds

Allow seedheads to dry on plants remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

San Diego, California(2 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

On Dec 3, 2009, femluc from Elizabethton, TN (Zone 6b) wrote:

I recently acquired some of the Baby's Toes plants and just adore them. I was worried about the right soil mixture, but I used a mixture of cactus mix and sand and evidently, I did something right because I just noticed some new growth. I have them growing inside in a clay flower pot with filtered light. This is a cute plant and seems to be non-temperamental, at least for now.

On Sep 18, 2007, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Have grown these in the garden for years. sometimes they do great, and sometimes they wither and die. not figured the problem out, but I can tell you that they don't like too much shade- get stretched and rot easily. but they don't like blazing, hot sun, either. makes them shrivel up and die. seem to like being wedged into places between rocks that protect them from hot afternoon sun, but get a lot of morning sun. Tolerate a lot of drought, but not too much, or again, they wither and die. Do very well in pots and seem to be a nearly carefree plant in a pot as long as lots of bright light or morning light and don't water all the time. They seem to prefer to be grown in a sandy mix (some grow them in nearly pure sand).

On Nov 15, 2004, dkorte from Long Beach, CA wrote:

I HAVE THE WHITE FLOWERED VARIETY , ITS BLOOMING RIGHT NOW, IT'S BEEN BLOOMING FOR AT LEAST 2 MONTHS. i CAN TELL YOU THEY REALLY LIKE BONEMEAL.
i HAD 2 - 2 1/2 IN PLANTS, ONE LOOKED BETTER THAN THE OTHER, I TRANSPLANTED THE TWO TO A SMALL BONZAI POT AND SOON HAD 2 SUCCESSIVE BLOOMS.
THE LIGHT IS SO-SO AT NIGHT WHERE i POT AND I TOP DRESSED WITH BONEMEAL INSTEAD OF THE CRUSHED STONE I THOUGHT I WAS USING. GAVE IT A LITTLE WATER ONCE IN AWHILE, WITHIN 2 WEEKS I HAD 7 FLOWERS AT THE SAME TIME. WHEN I REALIZED THE WATER WAS BEADING ON THE SURFACE AND WHAT HAD HAPPENED, I SCRAPED MOST OF THE BONEMEAL OFF AND REPLACED WITH CRUSHED STONE. THIS NOV MORN I HAVE 8 BUDS AND 1 LARGE FLOWER


Care of Baby Toes

Move pots to a fully sunlit area where temperatures range at least 65 F. (19 C.).

As with most succulent plants, the biggest problem is over or under watering. While Baby toes are tolerant of drought conditions, they need moisture to store in their leaves to sustain them during the growing season.

Baby toes have few pest or disease problems, but do watch out for rot when plants are over watered or in pots that don’t drain well.

Fertilize in early spring with a half dilution of cactus and succulent food. Suspend watering in the dormant season from November to February. Other than that, care of baby toes, is so easy the infant whose toes they resemble could almost grow these great little succulents.


Watch the video: Cultivo Los Lithops Cactus Piedra


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