Echeveria 'Compton Carousel'


Succulentopedia

Echeveria 'Compton Carousel' (Variegated Hens and Chicks)

Echeveria 'Compton Carousel' (Variegated Hens and Chicks) is a succulent plant that forms attractive, up to 6 inches (15 cm) tall clumps…


Ask a Question forum→Echeveria Compton Carousel suddenly shriveled up

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The more light, the better for indoor Echeverias.

Baja_Costero said: Did you get the plants bare root? How were the roots when you got them? Did you water right after potting them up? Did you look closely at the stem to see if it was soft or brown?

The more light, the better for indoor Echeverias.


Sudden death with these plants typically relates to rot getting into the stem, either sideways from water trapped in between the leaves, or upward from the roots (often too much water, or watering too soon after root damage). The changes are not often evident until it's way too late. Leaves may fall off for no reason, or start going soft. It's usually pretty obvious from a close inspection whether the stem has rot in it, so you can rule this possibility in or out if you can look carefully, especially at the base where the stem hits the soil.

Water deprivation on the other hand tends to be a grindingly slow, bit by bit process where the plant starts looking deflated everywhere and then begins to extract water from the lower leaves, dropping them one by one and shrinking the size of the rosette as a result. This process might take months or even years to reach a final conclusion. It does not typically result in the plant dropping plump, healthy leaves but only dry, dark, dehydrated ones.

Echeverias will sometimes go through shock when they have been bare-rooted and put through the mail, or otherwise manhandled invasively. They will sit there doing nothing for a while before they decide whether they still have zest for life. They may drop a few totally healthy leaves. I would expect this sort of thing as a matter of course, but it's nothing like the sudden decline you are reporting. The key is to provide strong light at this point and water only when the soil is going dry at depth.

Are you using fast-draining soil, like regular potting soil (I think you call it compost over there) mixed with an equal volume of perlite, pumice, or gritty equivalent? These plants like a nice airy mix and they resent it when the soil retains too much moisture. Do your pots all have holes at the bottom?

Baja_Costero said: Waiting a while after potting them up (a few days to a week) is best to be on the safe side. Your watering interval sounds about right (see if you can poke your finger into the soil to see how the moisture is below the surface, and wait until it's almost dry or dry down there).

Sudden death with these plants typically relates to rot getting into the stem, either sideways from water trapped in between the leaves, or upward from the roots (often too much water, or watering too soon after root damage). The changes are not often evident until it's way too late. Leaves may fall off for no reason, or start going soft. It's usually pretty obvious from a close inspection whether the stem has rot in it, so you can rule this possibility in or out if you can look carefully, especially at the base where the stem hits the soil.

Water deprivation on the other hand tends to be a grindingly slow, bit by bit process where the plant starts looking deflated everywhere and then begins to extract water from the lower leaves, dropping them one by one and shrinking the size of the rosette as a result. This process might take months or even years to reach a final conclusion. It does not typically result in the plant dropping plump, healthy leaves but only dry, dark, dehydrated ones.

Echeverias will sometimes go through shock when they have been bare-rooted and put through the mail, or otherwise manhandled invasively. They will sit there doing nothing for a while before they decide whether they still have zest for life. They may drop a few totally healthy leaves. I would expect this sort of thing as a matter of course, but it's nothing like the sudden decline you are reporting. The key is to provide strong light at this point and water only when the soil is going dry at depth.

Are you using fast-draining soil, like regular potting soil (I think you call it compost over there) mixed with an equal volume of perlite, pumice, or gritty equivalent? These plants like a nice airy mix and they resent it when the soil retains too much moisture. Do your pots all have holes at the bottom?

Thank you for your help. I think it was at least a week before I first watered the plant - it was back in December when I got it so I don't remember exactly but this is what I usually do with any new succulent plant or when repotting. I will start testing the soil before watering in future. Unfortunately its too late for this plant - it lost all its leaves from the lowest up until it was only left with a stem - I left it and continued to water hoping it might still have some life and put out a new shoot as it didn't look like it had rot in it but it is now completely shrivelled - this is all that's left now. I would like to get another as they are lovely plants but don't want to just have the same thing happen especially as they are quite expensive. I mix up the soil for my succulents rather than buying a ready-made mix - my usual mix is roughly equal parts: topsoil or compost, sand, coco coir, perlite. The pot I used was clay as I read this is better for drainage and it has a large drainage hole at the bottom.


This Rare Succulent Has the Prettiest Variegated Leaves

The cream-color and green foliage of Echeveria 'Compton Carousel' makes the whole plant look almost like a flower.

You've probably tried growing a succulent before, whether you picked up it as a cute desk plant or ended up with one as a gift. But while you might be familiar with the plump green leaves of common succulent species, there are a few rarer varieties that will stop you in your tracks (or stop your scrolling finger as you zip through Instagram). Echeveria ‘Compton Carousel’ (also known as ‘Lenore Dean’) is one such eye-catching plant it has beautiful cream-color leaves with a stripe of green along the middle of each one (the leaves sometimes turn light pink around the edges). However, it's uncommon enough that you’ll end up paying a pretty penny to add this beauty to your houseplant collection.

Though most succulents and Echeveria varieties are easy to grow, ‘Compton Carousel’ can be a little finicky, so it’s not a great choice for beginners. Like other succulents, it does best with bright light, but you need to be careful if you’re moving it to a different spot. It can get sunburned if it’s moved from an area with lower light into direct sun, so you’ll have to gradually introduce it to brighter light if you want to move it outside for the summer.

‘Compton Carousel’ is also very sensitive to overwatering. It’s best to let the soil dry out completely between waterings, because if your succulent ends up sitting in moist soil, it can develop root rot. Make sure it’s potted in a container with good drainage, and use a potting mix specifically formulated for succulents and cacti. When you do water it, water deeply and let the extra moisture drain out of the bottom of the pot.

Of course, all of this is assuming you can find one. This variegated succulent is so sought-after that it’s usually priced at $30 or higher for a single plant. Some sellers even have it listed for over $60 for a plant that’s just 3 inches wide (and it’s still out of stock).

That being said, if you’re able to get your hands on a ‘Compton Carousel’ it’ll definitely be one of the most beautiful plants in your collection. The variegated leaves instantly catch the eye (even more so if it's showing a tinge of pink), and from a distance, this succulent looks like it has swirls and stripes of color. If you’re taking really good care of it, ‘Compton Carousel’ can even bloom with orange and yellow flowers. At its largest, it’ll only reach about 6 inches tall and wide, but the flowers bloom on stems that can rise up to 1 foot tall.

If ‘Compton Carousel’ is on your wish list, you’ll probably have the best luck looking for this plant on Etsy, where a couple of sellers have it available. Or you can try reaching out to growers that have sold it in the past to see when they’ll restock. It’s probably not a good choice if you’ve never successfully kept a succulent alive before, but if you’re a new plant parent, you can test your skills on other colorful varieties that are easier to grow, such as pink succulents or even one with clear leaves. Still, there’s no harm in adding ‘Compton Carousel’ to your list of dream plants!


Watch the video: How To Care For: Echeveria Compton CarouselLenore Dean


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