Aloe striata subsp. karasbergensis


Succulentopedia

Aloe striata subsp. karasbergensis (Karasburg Coral Aloe)

Aloe striata subsp. karasbergensis (Karasburg Coral Aloe) is a low-growing succulent that forms beautifully symmetric rosettes of leaves…


Aloe striata subsp. karasbergensis - garden

Accepted Scientific Name: Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis (Pillans) Glen & D.S.Hardy
S. African J. Bot. 53(6): 491 (1987)

Accepted name in llifle Database:
Aloe striata Haw.
Trans. Linn. Soc. London 7: 18. 1804
Synonymy: 5

  • Aloe striata Haw.
  • Aloe albocincta Haw.
  • Aloe hanburiana Naudin
  • Aloe paniculata Jacq.
  • Aloe striata var. oligospila Baker
Accepted name in llifle Database:
Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis (Pillans) Glen & D.S.Hardy
S. African J. Bot. 53(6): 491 (1987)
Synonymy: 2
  • Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis (Pillans) Glen & D.S.Hardy
    • Aloe karasbergensis Pillans
Accepted name in llifle Database:
Aloe striata subs. komaggasensis (Kritz. & van Jaarsv.) Glen & D.S.Hardy
S. African J. Bot. 53(6): 491. 1987
Synonymy: 2
  • Aloe striata subs. komaggasensis (Kritz. & van Jaarsv.) Glen & D.S.Hardy
    • Aloe komaggasensis Kritz. & van Jaarsv.
Accepted name in llifle Database:
Aloe striata f. monstruosa variegata hort.
Trans. Linn. Soc. London 7: 18. 1804

Description: Aloe striata subsp. karasbergensis is an interesting species with greyish-green leaves and red, green - tipped flowers. This is a slightly larger, longer leaved version of Aloe striata with prominent, very ornamental, thin lines along the leaves. Large plants look very attractive. It is also related to Aloe buhrii, but the leaves are soft and more curved and striated.
Habit: Usually acaulescent, sometimes caulescent, simple or with up to 19 branches from suckers at the base of the rosettes with persisting dry leaves.
Stem: up to 30 cm tall.
Rosette: Low-growing, dense with very broad leaves up to 60 cm tall and 1 meter wide.
Leaves: Smooth, soft, broad- to narrow-lanceolate, curved, pale blue-green, greyish-green to greyish-yellow without markings and conspicuously or obscurely marked with longitudinal dark-green lines. In full sun the leaves take on a pink cast with dark reddish striations. Margin 2 - 3 mm dull white, usually thornless, sometimes crenulate with small teeth (Aloe striata usually is smooth along the leaf edges).
Inflorescence: slender 50-75 cm tall many-branched, festooned. Terminal racemes conical and lax.
Flowers: Green-tipped pink to pale coral-red, 25 - 27 mm long (Aloe striata usually bright orange).
Blooming seson: Flowers multiple times a year but mainly in mid to late winter and flowers last up to three months.
Chromosome number: 2n = 14

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Aloe striata group

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Urs Eggli “Illustrated Handbook of Suculent Plants: Monocotyledons” Springer, 2001.
2) Susan Carter, John J. Lavranos, Leonard E. Newton, Colin C. Walker “Aloes. The definitive guide.” Kew Publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2011, ISBN 978-1-84246-439-7, S. 251.
3) Court, D, 1981. “Succulent flora of Southern Africa” Balkema, Cape Town.
4) Germishuizen, G. & Meyer, N.L. (eds) 2003. “Plants of southern Africa : an annotated checklist.” Strelitzia 14. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.
5) Nichols, G. 2005. “Growing rare plants, a practical handbook on propagating the treatened plants of southern Africa” Southern African Botanical Diversity Network Report No. 36. SABONET, Pretoria .
6) Gilbert Westacott Reynolds “The aloes of South Africa” A.A. Balkema, 1974
7) Van Jaarsveld, E., Van Wyk, B-E. & Smith, G. 2000. “Succulents of South Africa” Cape Town , Tafelberg
8) Reynolds, G. W. 1982. “The Aloes of South Africa” ed. 4. Rotterdam.
pers, 1971
9) Van Wyk, B-E. & Smith, G. 1996. “Guide to the aloes of South Africa” Briza Publications, Pretoria.
10) Barbara Jeppe “South African aloes” Purnell, 1974
11) Ben-Erik Van Wyk, Gideon Smith “Guide to the Aloes of South Africa” 2nd edition, 2003
13) Kristo Pienaar “South African 'What Flower Is That'?” Struik, 01/Aug/2003


Aloe karasbergensis (Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Aloe karasbergensis (Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Aloe karasbergensis (Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Aloe karasbergensis (Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Aloe karasbergensis (Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Aloe karasbergensis (Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Aloe karasbergensis (Aloe striata subs. karasbergensis) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli

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Cultivation and Propagation: It is is an interesting succulent easy to cultivate under a wide variety of climatic conditions provided it is planted in a well-drained situation given adequate water but not over-watered. Although it originates in sub tropical tropical climate in the most arid regions of the Northern Cape and South-Namibia, in cultivation it can tolerate more water - but when over irrigated or in heavy soils the leaves will split open. . It is also a great choice for a hillside garden as roots are very tenacious.
Growth rate: It is pretty fast grower and appreciates a lot of water in warmer weather. Even young plants grow fairly quickly in the garden or in good sized pot.
Soil: Well-de-composed compost addition to well draining sandy-gritty mix creating a rich soil is advantageous.
Pots: It needs a relatively shallow pot to accommodate its fibrous roots and provide a very good drainage. It may stay in the same pot for many years.
Watering: Water aloes more than other succulents, keeping in mind that the pots dry out between watering. Keep dry in winter or when night temperatures remain below 10° C. Water it less than average if in bigger pots. Outdoors it grows to astonishing proportions also in areas with wet winters, so don't be afraid to plant this in a high-rainfall area. They are really not very demanding and regular watering in their growing season creates healthy disease resistant plants that will flower better.
Special need: Provide very good ventilation. Nearly all problems occur as a result of overwatering and poor ventilation, especially when weather conditions are dull and cool or very humid.
Fertilization: Light fertilizer seems to boost its growth whenever additional water is given. Feed it during the growing season with a fertilizer specifically formulated for cactus and succulents (high potash fertilizer with a dilute low nitrogen), including all micro nutrients and trace elements diluted to ½ the strength recommended on the label. It thrive in poor soils and needs a limited supplies of fertilizer to avoid the plant developing excess vegetation, which is easily attacked by fungal diseases.
Exposure: It will do its best in full sun to light shade and become stressed with inadequate light which could result in poor growth and unnatural shape. Will handle very harsh sunlight, sometimes taking on a coppery leaf sheen, a sign generally associated with stress.
Hardiness: It is a hardy aloe but not completely frost resistant. It will survive light frost but the flowers will not, but for safe cultivation it is best to avoid freezing temperatures. USDA Zone 9.
Pest and diseases: Occasionally these plants are infested by scale and aphids, but all known garden pests can be kept to a minimum by simply ensuring optimal growing conditions and healthy plants.
Use: It can be cultivated outdoors in raised beds and terraces and is one of the aloes that can form a centre piece in a garden or grouped, creating a magnificent backdrop, if you have the space, to provide form and texture. It do well in big pots as well.
Maintenance: Removal of old flower stalks.
Propagation: Aloe striata can be propagated by seed and suckers (if available). Sow seed in a well drained medium in shallow trays and cover lightly with sand or the seed will blow away. Once the seeds begin to germinate, keep moist but watch out for overwatering as the seedlings could rot. Transplant into small pots once they are about 3-4 cm high (approximately 6 months) using a sandy loam medium and feed with organic fertilizer at least once a quarter to ensure healthy growth. Plant regeneration (micropropagation) from root and embryo tissue is successful as well.


Aloe, Karasburg Coral Aloe

Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: karasbergensis (kar-as-berg-EN-sis) (Info)
Synonym:Aloe karasbergensis subsp. hunsbergensis
Synonym:Aloe skarasbergensis subsp. karasbergensi

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On Jan 23, 2015, poeciliopsis from Phoenix, AZ wrote:

Central Phoenix -- Two specimens grow in the ground in my garden. One is 25 years old, but still fairly small. It grows in full shade winter & summer, with monthly summer water and none in winter, and is under a winter cold frame. It is quite etiolated and seldom blooms. A two year old plant in the same bed, but in full afternoon summer sun is almost as big.

On Jul 20, 2012, baiissatva from Dunedin,
New Zealand wrote:

Zone 9, coastal otago, new zealand.

While amazingly beautiful when grown well, I've had a bugger of a time with this plant and found it one of my most demanding aloes. Too much heat= rot. Too little heat= rot. Grow it dry and it shrivels and sulks give it water = rot. I have all the other members in this striata complex of species and none of them have given me the slightest trouble, kouebokkeveldensis included.

I'm on my third plant and will give up when this one inevitably croaks, confining myself to drooling over the huge and impossibly gorgeous specimen in the local Bot Garden glasshouse.

I suspect they're best grown in the ground as opposed to a pot. Oh well.

On Oct 26, 2006, Porphyrostachys from Portland, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

Great plant that, like the related Aloe striata, tolerates the Arizona heat and frosts very well. It also flowers in summer when not much is going on! Too much sun will bleach it out and you'll lose the pretty lines in the leaves, but too little will make it grow entirely out of proportion. The plants here are kept under shade cloth in summer that is removed in the milder months. I would imagine that morning sun would also suit this plant well, but avoid trees whose canopy is too dense.

On Apr 15, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is a slightly larger, longer leaved version of striata with prominent, very ornamental, thin lines along the leaves. Large plants look very attractive. This one has small teeth along the leaf margins (A striata usually is smooth along the leaf edges). Flowers multiple times a year. Flowers are a bit roser colored (A striata usually bright orange). South African native- this variety is not endangered.


Cultivation [ edit ]

Aloe striata is cultivated as a popular ornamental plant, for use in succulent and drought tolerant gardens, and in container plantings. [5]

  • Aloe striata x maculata (synonym Aloe saponaria) — a hybrid between Aloe striata and Aloe maculata, is a popular garden plant. [6]
  • Aloe striata ssp. karasbergensis — Karasburg Coral Aloe, also cultivated as an ornamental plant. [7]


Name Status Confi­dence level Source Date supplied
Aloe striata subsp. karasbergensis (Pillans) Glen & D.S.Hardy Synonym WCSP 2012-03-26

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